jjpor: (Default)
Very sad news. I don't know, maybe I'm a naive idealist when it comes to that sort of thing, but I think in spite of all of the politics and international rivalries involved, the "space race" remains on the whole something we should be proud of, as a planet, regardless of nationalities and ideologies. And even if no human being ever sets foot on the moon again, twelve people did, once, and Neil Armstrong was the first of them. Every time I look up at the moon in the night sky, I'm reminded of that fact and quietly humbled by it.


Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] james_nicollat The first human to walk on the Moon has died


Former U.S. astronaut, Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, has died at the age of 82, U.S. media reported on Saturday.

Also posted at Dreamwidth, where there are comment count unavailable comment(s); comment here or there.
jjpor: (Default)
Another post of the What I Did On My Summer Holidays variety. Here's Hadrian's Wall, or what's left of it:

SL272045


Ramblings Ensue (in more ways than one)... )

Anyway, that's enough about that. ;)
jjpor: (The Brig)
Well, I have returned and, to be honest, despite my dire expectations the weather last week in the vicinity of Penrith and Keswick was much better than we could have hoped for; grey but dry last Saturday, Sunday, Monday, admittedly peeing down on Tuesday, but really rather bright and sunny for the rest of the week (although on Thursday I was trudging along an extremely exposed ridge on the Cumbria-Northumbria border following a mostly-surviving section of Hadrian's Wall, which while sunny proved to be blimmin' cold too).

Anyway, sights were seen, ale was quaffed and photos were taken, so I reckon I'm counting that one as a result. To get back on-topic, anyway:

SL271695


Read All About the Violent and Interesting History of Pencils! )

I will just leave you with a book rec. I am currently reading State of Emergency by Dominic Sandbrook, a social and political history of Britain between 1970 and 1974. The author is perhaps a bit softer than I would like on the Conservative Party in general and on then-Education Secretary Margaret Thatcher in particular (but then again, looking at the newspapers he writes for as a day job, this might not be wholly surprising), but not to the point where I'd say it was a one-sided view of the period. The stuff about contemporary popular culture is pure gold, and very interesting for the Doctor Who fan. The chapter about the rise in popularity of environmentalism during the period is even entitled "The Green Death", and features a detailed analysis of said Who story and a couple of others in the context of the period. I haven't got to the chapter about what many people at the time called "women's lib" yet, but a quick flick forward reveals repeated mentions of Sarah Jane Smith in the first couple of pages. ;D Good stuff.
jjpor: (Master III)
Back in the summer of 2007, myself and a couple of like-minded associates, still flushed with the success of our epic daytrip to the Imperial War Museum site at Duxford the previous year (Liverpool to Cambridgeshire and back again in one day, by road - don't try it!) decided that the next obvious step was an expedition to Bovington Tank Museum in Dorset. It ended up being a week-long "experience", a sort of nightmarish, occasionally drunken, parody of the British holidaymaking paradigm. A bit like Withnail & I but without the sparkling dialogue. Or the cake. Or not one, but two Doctors.

I may (or may not) share some tales about it as I post about some of the photographs I took during this week (all I can say is, I hope you all like looking at tanks). For now, get a load of this, taken in the heart of the good old New Forest:




Read more... )
jjpor: (Master 2)
For [livejournal.com profile] lost_spook, we open with a picture of Rhuddlan Castle, in northeastern Wales, taken iirc sometime during the summer of 2010:




READ ON...! )
jjpor: (Default)

You know, you can be as cynical as you like about the politics surrounding the space race (and you'd be right!) and there are certainly serious arguments as to why we just don't need manned spaceflight, but my inner space cadet can't help thinking "Fifty years, and we're still tooling around in low orbit?" Apart from the moon landings, of course, but they were a long time ago too...


Plus great big rockets are really cool! ;D

Hopefully, though, to strike a sickeningly utopian retro-sf note, when people look back in centuries to come the Cold War will seem like a curiosity and Gagarin and the other space pioneers will be remembered as great figures in human history. Hopefully.
jjpor: (Default)

You know, you can be as cynical as you like about the politics surrounding the space race (and you'd be right!) and there are certainly serious arguments as to why we just don't need manned spaceflight, but my inner space cadet can't help thinking "Fifty years, and we're still tooling around in low orbit?" Apart from the moon landings, of course, but they were a long time ago too...


Plus great big rockets are really cool! ;D

Hopefully, though, to strike a sickeningly utopian retro-sf note, when people look back in centuries to come the Cold War will seem like a curiosity and Gagarin and the other space pioneers will be remembered as great figures in human history. Hopefully.
jjpor: (One)
I'm thinking about Who (not unusual where I'm concerned), and I'm thinking about historicals. Or rather, the lack of them in modern Who (and by modern, I mean Who after about 1966!). Black Orchid, of course, is the last entry in the genre, and I'd even argue that that is not a true historical. Okay, it's a story in a period setting that doesn't feature any outright science fiction elements, so it has that. When I talk about historicals, though, I'm talking about stories about famous events and people and settings that you may have heard about back in long-ago school daze.
Read On... )
jjpor: (One)
I'm thinking about Who (not unusual where I'm concerned), and I'm thinking about historicals. Or rather, the lack of them in modern Who (and by modern, I mean Who after about 1966!). Black Orchid, of course, is the last entry in the genre, and I'd even argue that that is not a true historical. Okay, it's a story in a period setting that doesn't feature any outright science fiction elements, so it has that. When I talk about historicals, though, I'm talking about stories about famous events and people and settings that you may have heard about back in long-ago school daze.
Read On... )

Profile

jjpor: (Default)
jjpor

April 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
910111213 1415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 20th, 2017 08:51 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios